Baritone Ryan Thorn as Marcello was a complete delight. His tall and solid form executed the required physical comedy with ease... Thorn so looked and acted the effortlessly cool hipster part that one suspects he actually is a hipster.

– RD Foster (www.examiner.com)

Ryan Thorn’s voice (Angelotti) was steel-cut and bell clear. He anchored the stage and entire room with its granite power. I longed to hear more of it.

– RD Foster (www.examiner.com)


Baritone Ryan Thorn as Marcello was a complete delight. His tall and solid form executed the required physical comedy with ease... Thorn so looked and acted the effortlessly cool hipster part that one suspects he actually is a hipster.
RD Foster (Examiner.com)
Full review

Ryan Thorn’s voice (Angelotti) was steel-cut and bell clear. He anchored the stage and entire room with its granite power. I longed to hear more of it.
RD Foster (Examiner.com)
Full review

Thorn hilariously hams it up as Giove, setting the tone for La Calisto from start to finish. His versatile voice is almost equally at home in the falsetto he adopts for his Diana disguise as for the commanding baritone he wields so effortlessly as king of the gods... Thorn is the musical and dramatic anchor of the production.
Barnaby Hughes (Stage and Cinema)
Full review

In Marriage of Figaro, (we saw the second-night cast), the heavenly and masculine baritone voice of lead character Ryan Thorn as Figaro, and that of the Count Luvi Avendano are very pleasing and strong.  Their comic chops help carry the show.
Georja Umano (Splash Magazines)
Full review

Throughout, the composer uses interludes with Tim the Candy Butcher to break up the story.  Thorn’s comedic abilities and booming voice brought to life the less-than-two-minute monologue he has each time he arrives, hawking apples (later, candy, and later still, magazines) to all the passengers.  Thorn is so jovial and home-grown in his delivery, that one really wishes we could interrupt the opera and buy an apple from him.
Yilin Hsu Wentlandt  (Singerpreneur)
Full review

His voice is a pleasantly resonant baritone, his acting ability competent. I have no reservations over his youth—after all, Gilbert blithely uses anomalies of age repeatedly in Pinafore to score satirical points. Thorn’s manner and bearing might be thought too elegant for the decidedly middle-class Corcoran and his middle-class morality, but again, it works in context, despite being nonstandard.
Barry Brenesal (Fanfare)
Full review